Shadow Box Part 2

Posted 05.01.2019 by Kitty Costello

We experimented quite a bit with the Shadow Box idea and finally finished up the experiment this past week. Even though we didn’t have a clear idea of what we were going for here we kept coming back to talking about light, color and depth of the little scenes in each box.

Daughter Manufacturing Shadow Box





Daughter Manufacturing Shadow Box

The first concept, examined in the Blog Post 8, didn’t work out as planned. The multiple layers of epoxy didn’t really give much feeling of depth and, while we thought maybe making the images “murky” would be interesting in the beginning, we felt found it to be less and less interesting with each layer of epoxy we poured. Some of this may have had to do with going a shade or two too dark on the tint, which obscured the objects inside, but some it also had to do with calculating cost of filling up the entire box with epoxy and the time involved. Epoxy isn’t cheap and, in this application, it has to be poured 1/8” to 1/4” at a time.





Daughter Manufacturing Shadow Box

The second concept involved using tinted/transparent acrylic sheets in the foreground and opaque colored sheets in the background to give the same effect. The colors available weren’t great once we saw them up close (fluorescent in a gaudy, cheap way) and the transparent front panel just ended up coloring everything in a monotone and neutralizing the back panel color from having any impact in terms of altering the color.





Daughter Manufacturing Shadow Box

The final iteration involved a back panel of mirrored acrylic with a thin layer of tinted epoxy poured on top of it and then a simple clear acrylic front panel. Part of the challenge was just getting light into these deep, dark little boxes and we found that the mirrored acrylic lightened things up and the tinting the epoxy allowed us more control over the coloring. The tints came out a bit on the lighter than intended and on the fluorescent side of the spectrum, but they also brightened up the interiors and revealed more details of the subjects inside. We thought about leaving the front panel off so that the interiors were more immediate and not confused by the reflections, but settled on including so that part felt finished and the scenes “encapsulated” and separated from the viewer.

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Please allow 5 days for fabrication.